How Streets of Trenton Obtained Present Names

ABERNATHY DRIVE
Abernathy Drive memorializes the name of Mr. James Abernathy, famous Scotch engineer. Charles G. Teunon gave this thoroughfare its present name.

ALLEN STREET
When this thoroughfare was laid out it was named Woodruff Street in honor of Mayor Aaron D. Woodruff. The origin of its present name is in doubt, but there is reason to believe that it stands for William Henry Allen, a distinguished American naval officer. This is supported in part by Montgomery Street, which bears the name of Richard Montgomery, who was also a noted naval officer. William Henry Allen won distinction in 1812 as First Lieutenant of the frigate United States in the action with the Macedonian.

ACADEMY STREET
It was in the early days of the Republic that Academy Street was changed from Fourth Street, in keeping with the changes of other numbered streets in the centre of the city. The street was appropriately named for the famous Trenton Academy which opened early in the century and occupied the site of the present public library, The Trenton Academy played a great part in moulding the lives of many young men of the city and it stands out historically as one of the fine educational institutions of the country.

ASBURY STREET
This street, which stands for Francis Asbury, noted Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church, was evidently named by the congregation of the Union Street M.E. Church, whose edifice stood on the site now occupied by the Brothers of Israel Synagogue. The land in the rear of this church, which was once a graveyard, extended back to Asbury Street. Francis Asbury preached in Trenton for the first time May 20, 1772. He attended the laying of the foundation of the first local Methodist Church in 1773. In 1857 it was proposed to change the name of Asbury Street to Maxwell Street.

ASHMORE AVENUE
This thoroughfare was named for the Ashmore family, whose members were prominent in the early life of Lamberton, now the Sixth Ward. Some of these were identified with transportation on the Delaware.

ATTERBURY AVENUE
This street, once a part of the Atterbury estate, formerly the Hermitage estate of General Philemon Dickinson, bears the name of Edward J. C. Atterbury, a prominent resident of the town. For a number of years he conducted the American Star Anvil Works. He retired from business about the time of the Civil War.

BANK STREET
This thoroughfare was once called Union Street. As this street was often confused with Union Street, South Trenton, the name was changed to Bank Street because of the State Bank that stood on the site of St. Mary’s Convent. Robert McNeely, tanyard owner and Mayor of Trenton, laid out the first building lots along this street.

BARBARA STREET
The first record of this street is indicated on what is known as the Sloan and Rowley Plan of Lots. The origin of its name is obscure. However, the story goes that it bears the given name of the first woman to purchase a lot when the locality was developed.

BARNES STREET
This street bears the name of the Barnes family, whose members owned land in the locality. Thomas Barnes, one of Trenton’s early druggists, lived in a house that stood on the site of the Third Presbyterian Church, Warren Street. Barnes Street was accepted by ordinance passed March 12, 1851.

BARNT AVENUE
Barnt Avenue bears the given name of Barnt de Klyn, who lived in Bow Hill Mansion which stands in the locality. Mr. De Klyn was of French Huguenot extraction. At the time of the Revolution he was a manufacturer of woolen cloth. For a short time he conducted a store in the centre of town. He died at Bow Hill in the Fall of 1824.

BEAKES AVENUE
Beakes Avenue perpetuates the name of one of the pioneer families of Trenton. This street was once a part of the Nathan Beakes plantation which embraced many acres in the locality. The plantation dwelling, a two-story structure, with a low hanging roof, stood on a site which is identified today as the north side of Beakes Street near the corner of New Willow Street. A large barn and a number of the out-buildings stood nearby. The Beakes family was connected by marriage to both the Stacy and Trent families. Beakes Avenue was accepted by ordinance of June 2, 1885.

BEATTY STREET, see LALOR STREET

BELVIDERE STREET
Belvidere Avenue was named for the Delaware and Belvidere division of the Pennsylvania Railroad. This street was accepted by ordinance passed October 20, 1885.

BERKELEY AVENUE
Berkeley Avenue obtains its name from John Lord Berkeley, one of the first owners of New Jersey under Royal grant. His name appears frequently in the early history of New Jersey in connection with the original government and the division of land. He was linked with Sir George Carteret in the original grant.

BLOOMSBURY STREET
Bloomsbury Street, formerly Fair Street, was named after the village of Bloomsbury, (which in turn received its name from Bloomsbury Court, once the home of Judge William Trent). It was probably originally known as Water Street, for it was surveyed by the surveyor of highways in 1825 and was then a continuation of a thoroughfare known as Water Street. The Bloomsbury Inn building, now owned by the City of Trenton, is believed to be the oldest structure along the street today. There was a proposal in 1857 to name the street Delaware Street.

BOUDINOT STREET
This thoroughfare, once a part of Atterbury tract, formerly the Hermitage estate of General Philemon Dickinson, perpetuates the name of Elias Boudinot, distinguished figure of Revolutionary and post war days. From 1808 to the time of his death in 1821, he was a resident of Burlington. Mr. Boudinot was a grandfather of Edward J. C. Atterbury, once owner of the Atterbury estate. Murray Street, a part of the same estate, was named for Mrs. Atterbury’s family.

BOW HILL AVENUE
This thoroughfare was named for Bow Hill Mansion, once the home of Barnt De Klyn. The story goes that Joseph Bonaparte, ex-king of Naples and Spain, rented it for a time for his beautiful protegee, Annette Savage. The estate, known as the Bow Hill farm, obtained its name from the bow-shaped ridge along the Delaware.

BRIDGE STREET
Bridge Street obtains its name from the first bridge to span the Delaware at Trenton. This structure, which consisted of five wooden arches, each composed of five great arched ribs rising from the base, was considered in its day on of the finest works of bridge engineering in America. The present new free bridge spans the site. The building of the original bridge began in May, 1804, and it was finished and open for travel on January 30, 1806. This marked the decline of the Trenton ferry.

BROAD STREET
Broad Street was once named Queen Street in honor of the wife of the reigning King of England. But the Revolutionary War changed things considerably and the street became known as Greene Street, and still later in 1889 it was changed to Broad Street because of its width. Aside from its commercial activity it has many historical associations. It was down this street that the patriot host under Washington swept on the fateful morning of December 26, 1776 and routed the Hessians with the befuddled Colonel Rall at their head. At the head of Warren and Broad Streets stands the beautiful monument to commemorate the Battle of Trenton.

BROWN STREET
Brown Street bears the name of the Rev. George F. Brown, D. D., once pastor of the First Methodist Church of Trenton and presiding officer of the Trenton District. Mr. Brown was one of the developers of the tract through which the street runs.

BRUNSWICK AVENUE
The stretch of this street within the city limits from the Five Points to a point above Mulberry Street was originally a part of the Maidenhead Road, now the Lawrence Road. After 1804 a straight highway was opened as turnpike to New Brunswick and the avenue took the name Brunswick

CADWALADER DRIVE
Cadwalader Drive was named for the Cadwalader family, whose members had extensive holdings in the western section of the city. The progenitor of the family in Trenton was Dr. Thomas Cadwalader, who was the First Chief Burgess of the settlement during the years it had a borough government operating under a charter granted by King George, the Second. He founded a public library in Trenton in 1750.

CALHOUN STREET
Calhoun Street is the outgrowth of Calhoun Lane, where Alexander Calhoun lived and kept a general merchandise store, about at its junction with Pennington Avenue. The lane led from this point, crossing what used to be the river road near where the present feeder runs, and ended at Beatty’s Ferry on the river. It was an important artery of traffic in the early days and today it forms one of the two principal outlets of the city to Pennsylvania.

CANAL STREET
Canal Street bears the name of the Delaware and Raritan Canal. It was originally plotted out to extend to Perry Street. The tracks of the Pennsylvania Railroad now cover this site. In 1857 it was proposed to change the name of a portion of this street to Cadwalader Street.

CARROLL STREET
Carroll Street probably bears the name of Charles Carroll, of Carrolton, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. It was cut through lands of Thomas Cadwalader and wife, James M. Redmond and wife, Louis P. Higbee and wife, William P. Sherman and wife, Lucy Anna Higbee, Jacob Waldburg and wife, and John H. McIntosh and wife; was deeded to the city May 16, 1850, and accepted by ordinance passed March 12, 1851. When first opened Carroll Street did not extend to Perry. This extension was made possible by ordinance passed April 3, 1855.

CARTERET AVENUE
Carteret Avenue is named for Sir George Carteret, one of the first owners of New Jersey under royal grant. He was a lieutenant-governor in the island of Jersey in the English Channel and had successfully defended its position for Charles I against the parliamentary army of Cromwell.

CASS STREET
This thoroughfare, once called Washington Street, perpetuates the name of General Lewis Cass, of Michigan, Secretary of War under President Andrew Jackson. General Cass was twice defeated for the Presidency. He served as Secretary of State in 1857.

CAVELL STREET
Cavell Street perpetuated the name of Edith Cavell, the English war nurse who was executed by the Germans in October, 1915, on the charge of aiding in the escape of British prisoners. Cavell Street was opened and developed by Samuel Hilton. It runs through what was once the Colonel Thomas Chambers tract. One portion of this land was purchased by the grandfather of the colonel in 1788, and another portion in 1792.

CENTENNIAL AVENUE
This thoroughfare was named in honor of the American Centennial in 1876. It was accepted by ordinance passed June 8, 1899. Trenton also has a Centennial Block and a Centennial School.

CENTRE STREET
Centre Street was probably so named because it was once one of the leading thoroughfares of Nottingham Township, Burlington County. It is designated in old records as Front Street and as Second Street. The first Baptist meeting house of Trenton and locality, known as the “Trenton and Lamberton Baptist Church,” was erected along this highway in 1805. The First Baptist Church now stands on the site. The first free public school building of Trenton and locality was also built along this street.

CHAMBERS STREET
This thoroughfare memorializes the name of Chambers Family. Robert Chambers was the founder of Chambersburg. The Abner Chambers mansion, which stood at Greenwood Avenue and Chambers Street, was demolished soon after the new Central High School was built. Robert Chambers died February 22, 1865.

CHANCERY LANE
The original stretch of this thoroughfare which runs north of State Street is the outgrowth of Chancery Court, so-named because of the Court of Chancery and clerk’s offices that were located in a building that stood on the site of the Trenton Trust and Safe Deposit Company building. This court from its northern terminus was extended to Bank Street by an ordinance passed February, 1869. Within recent years the part of the lane running from State to Front Street, once known as Sterling’s Alley, was widened as an extension of the street. It was at this time that the name of the whole was changed to Chancery Lane.

CHAPEL STREET
Chapel Street bears the name of the Presbyterian Mission Chapel that once stood on the east side of Princeton Avenue facing the head of its namesake. The street runs approximately on the line of a lane that led to the entrance of the Trenton Cemetery, which was laid out more than 90 years ago in the rear of the avenue north of Gordon Street. Dwellings now stand on the cemetery site. The Fifth Presbyterian Church now occupies the site of the chapel.

CHERRY STREET, see CHESTNUT AVENUE

CHESTNUT AVENUE
This thoroughfare was named for a kind of tree. Some other local streets that bear the name of trees are Mulberry, PineSpruceWalnutCherryPlum and Pear and Locust.

CHURCH STREET
This street, which was cut through what was known as the Moses farm, obtained its name from the Prospect Street Presbyterian Church. The original stretch of the thoroughfare was accepted by ordinance passed April 14, 1882. The extension was accepted by ordinance passed June 15, 1886. The Prospect Street Presbyterian Church was completed in 1875, and was the sixth in order of Presbyterian churches of the city to be organized.

CLAY STREET
Clay Street is said to bear the name of Henry Clay, the distinguished Southern statesman. It was dedicated and accepted by ordinance passed October 7, 1862.

CLIFF STREET
Cliff Street was so named for the high ground along the Delaware River at the western terminus of the thoroughfare.

COMMERCE STREET
The name of this street was probably suggested by the commercial activity that centered at the canal basin which once existed between it and Merchant Street. The street was accepted by ordinance passed March 12, 1851. In 1857 it was proposed to change the name of Commerce Street to Lawrie Street in honor of Gawen Lawrie, third Governor of East Jersey.

COOPER STREET
This thoroughfare bears the name of Peter Cooper, of New York, who established a rolling mill in Trenton, and who was later one of the owners of the Trenton Iron Works. The Cooper School also bears his name.

DAVIES STREET
Davies street was named for Edward Davies, who owned land through which this thoroughfare was cut. Along this street Mr. Davies operated a fine brick plant.

DAYTON STREET
This thoroughfare memorializes the name of William L. Dayton, a member of the United States Senate representing New Jersey. In 1856 he was nominated Vice President on the Republican ticket. In 1857 he was appointed attorney general, a position he held when appointed by Lincoln as Minister Plenipotentiary to France. Mr. Dayton for a number of years, lived in one of the residences that occupied the site of State Capitol Annex.

DECATUR STREET
Decatur Street bears the name of that dashing naval officer, Stephen Decatur. In 1857 it was proposed to change the name to Coxe Street, after the Coxe family.

DeKLYN AVENUE, see LALOR STREET

DICKINSON STREET, see TYRELL AVENUE

DUNHAM STREET
Dunham Street was named for Calvin T. Dunham, a member of the Calhoun Realty Company, developers of the tract through which the thoroughfare runs. The street was opened in 1912. The tract formerly was the site of the Fell & Roberts brickyard.

ELIZABETH STREET, see LALOR STREET

EWING STREET
This street bears the name of the Ewing family. It was planned in 1849, though lands owned by Thomas Cadwalader and wife, James M. Redmond and wife and William P. Sherman and wife. The street was deeded to the city May 17, 1850, and was accepted March 12, 1851.

FACTORY STREET
The name of this thoroughfare was suggested by an early factory that once stood along it. In 1857 it was proposed to name it for Gideon H. Wells, who was identified with two or three factories in that locality.

FALL STREET
Fall Street obtained its name from the fall line in the Delaware. In 1857 it was proposed to change its name to Barclay Street, after Robert Barclay, second governor of East Jersey.

FEEDER STREET
This street obtained its name from the Delaware and Raritan Canal-Feeder. The part of this thoroughfare on the north side of the waterway now bears the name of Holland Avenue. In 1857 it was proposed to change the name of South Feeder to Collins Street after Isaac Collins, noted printer, who was the founder of the New Jersey Gazette.

FERRY STREET
Ferry Street, in South Trenton, is one of Trenton’s oldest highways. Once known as the Ferry Road, or the road to Trenton Ferry, it obtained its name from the ferry at its western terminus. From Colonial times up to the building of the first bridge across the Delaware, it was a very busy place.

FOUNTAIN AVENUE
This thoroughfare probably derived its name from the springs, called fountains, that once furnished for the small reservoirs of the Trenton Water Works and the Trenton Aqueduct Companies. For many years a large tract of land at the end of the street was known as the Fountain lots. The street was accepted by ordinance passed September 3, 1873.

FRONT STREET
Front Street is the only thoroughfare in the centre of Trenton that still bears its original title. Its appropriateness, however, is not so manifest today as it was when it fronted on the Assunpink Creek. The ground between Front Street and the Assunpink, especially east of what is now Broad Street, was called Littleworth because being exposed to the creek freshets it was of little worth. The creek in those days was something of a stream and there had been no filling in of the banks.

FULTON STREET
Fulton Street bears the name of Robert Fulton, who is generally credited in popular histories as the inventor of the steam-boat. The name was changed from that of William Street by ordinance passed November 1, 1889.

FURMAN STREET
Furman Street, according to proposals to change the names of streets in 1857, was named for Moore Furman, the first mayor of Trenton.

GARFIELD AVENUE, see MONROE STREET

GENERAL GREENE AVENUE
General Greene Avenue perpetuates the name of General Nathaniel Greene, who commanded one of the two American divisions at the Battle of Trenton. General Washington was with Greene’s division when it entered the village.

GENESEE STREET
This thoroughfare was once designated Hamilton Street in honor of Alexander Hamilton, Secretary of the Treasury. Its name was changed to Genesee Street by ordinance passed November 1, 1889, in order to avoid confusion with Hamilton Avenue. Genesee Street was probably named for Genesee Falls in New York.

GORDON STREET
This street bears the name of Elisha Gordon, a prominent citizen of the town who established a cemetery just north of it in 1837. In the next year Gordon organized a company to conduct the enterprise. This was incorporated under the name of The Trenton Cemetery Company. The cemetery embraced two and a quarter acres of land and comprised 572 Burial plots. It was abandoned years ago.

GREENWOOD AVENUE
The name of this thoroughfare was suggested by the luxuriant trees that once grew in this section. The portion of this avenue between Broad Street and the Delaware and Raritan Canal was originally named Taylor Street in honor of James Taylor, who, with Henry Speeler, founded a pottery along it in 1852. Later the plant was operated by Taylor and Davis and still later by Isaac Davis. The name of Taylor Street was changed to Greenwood Avenue by ordinance passed November 1, 1889.

HAMILTON AVENUE
For many years, known as the Sandtown Road it was named Hamilton Avenue in honor of Alexander Hamilton, Secretary of the Treasury. In 1857 it was proposed to call this road Huddy Avenue, after Captain Huddy of Revolutionary fame.

HANOVER STREET
How Hanover Street came by its present title is something of a puzzler. After the Revolutionary War it was changed from Third Street. Why the patriots and the citizens of a new country should have named the street after the then reigning family of England has never been satisfactorily explained. There was plenty of anti-British feeling in the early days of the Republic, and historians have been given not a little trouble in trying to determine why the thoroughfare should have been named after the House of Hanover from which the Georges of England sprang.

HARDING STREET, see MONROE STREET

HART AVENUE, see TYRELL AVENUE

HERMITAGE AVENUE
This thoroughfare obtained its name from the Hermitage, the historic home of General Philemon Dickinson, head of the Provincial forces of New Jersey in Revolutionary days and after. The original Hermitage, which was visited by General Washington, Robert Morris, John Adams, General Moreau and others, stood on or near the site of the present Hermitage. Hermitage Avenue was extended over and across the lands of the railroad and the canal by ordinance approved March 19, 1896.

HEWITT STREET
Hewitt Street bears the name of Charles Hewitt, once president of the Trenton Rolling Mill and senator from Mercer County.

HOLLAND AVENUE, see FEEDER STREET

HOWELL STREET
Howell Street was named for William C. Howell, who for many years was a local justice of the peace.

HURLEY STREET, see TYRELL AVENUE

INDIANA AVENUE, see OHIO AVENUE

INGHAM AVENUE
Ingham Avenue was named for Samuel D. Ingham, Secretary of the Treasury under President Jackson, by George Wainwright. Mr. Wainwright, purchased of Mr. Ingham the tract through which the street runs. These men were distant relatives. Samuel D. Ingham was a financier of national repute. Born at the Great Springs, near New Hope, Pa., he became a resident of Trenton in 1849. He died in Trenton June 5, 1860.

JACKSON STREET
A part of this thoroughfare was originally named Harrison Street in honor of President William Henry Harrison. Eventually the street from end to end was given the name of Jackson Street for President Andrew Jackson.

JEFFERSON AVENUE, see MONROE STREET

JOHN FITCH WAY
The original name of this thoroughfare was Commercial Avenue. Largely through the efforts of former Mayor Frederick W. Donnelly the name was changed to perpetuate the memory of Lieutenant John Fitch, who operated a commercial steamboat on the Delaware in the summer of 1790, just 17 years before Robert Fulton’s “Clermont” plied the Hudson. At the head of the way stands the Fitch Memorial Boulder erected by the City Commission in November, 1921. At the time of the Revolution, Fitch had a gunshop on North Warren Street. He was a member of the second military company raised in the town.

KELSEY AVENUE
This street memorializes the name of Henry C. Kelsey, who for many years was Secretary of State of New Jersey, and who was well-known in Trenton as a philanthropist.

KIRKBRIDE AVENUE
Kirkbride Avenue, which runs through land that was once a part of the Beakes plantation, bears the name of the Kirkbrides, an early family of Trenton. The Beakes family and the Kirkbride family were connected by marriage. Sarah, daughter of Mahlon Stacy, the first settler, married Joseph Kirkbride. Ruth, sister of Sarah, married William Beakes.

LA BARRE AVENUE
The thoroughfare memorializes the name of Mayor George B. La Barre. The original name of the street was Marshall Avenue.

LAFAYETTE STREET
The original name of this thoroughfare was Washington Street. In 1857 it was proposed to call it Stacy Street after Mahlon Stacy, the first settler at Trenton. In November, 1889, the name was changed to Lafayette Street in honor of General Lafayette. For a short time before its present name was adopted, it is said, it was called Maiden Lane.

LALOR STREET
Lalor Street takes its name from Jeremiah Lalor, who owned 300 acres of land on either side of the present road, east of the canal. The street derived its title early in the ’60’s. It was a country road up to that time. When the estate was partially divided into building lots, the plans were drawn by Miss Elizabeth Lalor and the streets were called after members of the family – Virginia, Elizabeth, Barnt, DeKlyn, Randall, Beatty and Smith.

LAMBERTON STREET
This thoroughfare derives its name originally from the Lambert family, one of the pioneer families of Trenton. A proposal to change the names of many of Trenton’s streets made to Common Council by a committee of citizens in 1857 reads: “We propose that the street leading from the river through the 6th ward, be called Lambert street, after the family that were large landed proprietors there.”

LANDING STREET
Evidently so-named because of a boat landing at the end of this thoroughfare. In 1857 it was proposed to name it Hart Street.

LEE AVENUE
Lee Avenue memorializes the name of Francis B. Lee, lawyer and historian, who was very active in the park development of the land along the Delaware in the rear of the State House to Brookville. Mr. Lee was the author of a number of historical works and papers, including a history of Trenton.

LEWIS STREET
Lewis Street was named for the Lewis family. It was opened by R. M. and L. Lewis Association, land developers.

LIBERTY STREET
Liberty Street was named for American independence. It was accepted by a city ordinance passed November 1, 1889. Trenton’s first Jewish cemetery is located along Liberty Street.

LINCOLN STREET, see MONROE STREET

LOCUST STREET, see CHESTNUT AVENUE

MARKET STREET
This thoroughfare obtained its name from the Market House, known as the Mill Hill Market Market House, which once stood in its centre facing Broad Street. The stretch of this street, from Broad to Warren, runs approximately on a line with a road that once led to Bloomsbury Court. This road turned to the left upon reaching the lodge-keeper’s house on the Bloomsbury estate and then continued on a line with what is now Union Street. The Mill Hill Market House was a notable landmark as the upper story of the structure housed the Mill Hill Academy. For a few years the building was the headquarters of the Eagle Volunteer Fire Company.

McKINLEY AVENUE, see MONROE STREET

MERCER STREET
This thoroughfare was named after General Hugh Mercer, of Revolutionary fame, who was killed at the Battle of Princeton. Trenton’s first High School building, now the William McKinley School, stands along the street.

MEYER STREET
This thoroughfare was named for the late Charles Meyer well-known butcher, who owned land in the locality.

MICHIGAN AVENUE, see OHIO AVENUE

MIDDLE ROSE STREET, see ROSE STREET

MILL STREET
This street was so-named because it led to a mill along the Delaware. In 1857 it was proposed to name it Jennings Street in honor of Samuel Jennings, second Governor of West Jersey.

MILLER STREET
Miller Street was named after the Miller family, whose members for many years were residents of the North Trenton section. Near the point where this street joins Brunswick Avenue, George J. Miller, one of the best known of the local oldtime school teachers once conducted a school in a barn-like structure. Some of Trenton’s most prominent citizens were first initiated into the mysteries of the three R’s in that crude building.

MODEL AVENUE
Model Avenue owes its name to the Model School. It was accepted by the city in 1874. For many years it was a dead-end street.

MONROE STREET
Monroe Street, which was accepted by ordinance passed June 2, 1885, bears the name of President James Monroe, who as a young man was injured at the Battle of Trenton. Other streets named after Presidents are McKinley,GarfieldHardingLincolnJeffersonWashington, Jackson and Roosevelt.

MONTGOMERY PLACE
Montgomery Place bears the name of Augustus R. Montgomery, who owned the old mansion which still stands back from West State Street. The estate once included considerable land in the locality on which dwellings now stand. The late Patrick J. Berry, contractor and builder, erected a number of these homes.

MONTGOMERY STREET
Montgomery Street was once known as Quaker Lane. The name of Quaker Lane was due to the presence of the Friends’ Meeting House at the corner of what is now Hanover and Montgomery Streets. The street is called after Richard Montgomery, the brave American officer who fell at Quebec. The Friends are still in possession of the meeting house and the structure and its surrounding grounds provide one of the interesting historical sites of the city.

MORGAN AVENUE
Morgan Avenue bears the given name of Morgan Beakes, son of Nathan Beakes and grandson of Morgan Beakes. This thoroughfare runs through land that was once a part of the Beakes plantation. Morgan Beakes was one of the last members of the Beakes family to occupy the plantation dwelling. He was one of the early brickmakers of the North Trenton section which in much later years became a noted brickmaking centre. It was about 1824 that he made bricks on the plantation in connection with his usual occupation of farming. He died in the Spring of 1864, aged 75 years. Morgan Avenue was accepted by ordinance passed June 2, 1885.

MULBERRY STREET
What is now Mulberry Street runs approximately on a line with a road that once connected the Brunswick Road with Samuel Henry’s grist mill which stood on the site of the Empire Rubber Company factory. For a number of years it seemed to have no definite name, being referred to at different times as the Mill Road, the road to the Stille House, Thompson’s Lane and Craft’s Lane. These names are, of course, reminiscent of the grist mill, the distillery that once stood along the canal, and families that once lived in an old-time dwelling along Brunswick Avenue at the head of the thoroughfare. The present name of the street is said to have been suggested by the mulberry trees planted in the locality in the thirties or forties by John Dickinson, who was interested in silkworm culture which proved to be such a dismal failure in this section of the country.

MURRAY STREET, see BOUDINOT STREET

NAPTON STREET, see TYRELL AVENUE

NEW ROSE STREET, see ROSE STREET

NEW YORK AVENUE, see OHIO AVENUE

OGDEN STREET
Ogden Street bears the name of Aaron Ogden, who was Governor of New Jersey from 1803 to 1813. He was a veteran of the Revolution.

OHIO AVENUE
Ohio Avenue was named for the State of Ohio. It divided the tract developed by the Enterprise Land Company. Other streets bearing the names of States on this tract are Pennsylvania, Michigan, Indiana and New York Avenues.

OLD ROSE STREET, see ROSE STREET

OLDEN AVENUE
Olden Avenue memorializes the name of Charles S. Olden, who was Governor of New Jersey in Civil War days. Camp Olden at Trenton, opened during the conflict, was named for him.

OTT STREET, see TYRELL AVENUE

PARKWAY AVENUE
For many years this thoroughfare was known as the Scotch Road. In early records it is mentioned as “ye Scotch or Middle Road.” It is referred to in old advertisements as “Scot’s Road,” in a survey made of the site of Trenton in 1714, it is shown as a road to the “Scot House.” A portion of the original highway still bears the name of Scotch Road. In the past year it was proposed to change the name of Parkway Avenue to Washington Way, memorializing General Washington’s march to Trenton.

PASSAIC STREET
This street evidently was named for Passaic County or the City of Passaic. It was dedicated and accepted by ordinance passed September 1, 1885.

PAUL AVENUE
This street was named for Joseph C. Paul, who at one time owned considerable land in the locality. The original dwelling of the Paul farm was destroyed by fire many years ago. The street was accepted by the city in 1889.

PEACE STREET
This street was named for one of Trenton’s Colonial families. Joseph Peace was the owner of a tract of land along the Assunpink Creek and the lowlands that once existed in the locality of the street were called “Peace’s meadows.” Peace purchased this land from James Trent, son of William Trent, by deed, dated March 10, 1732. Peace Street was so named by ordinance passed in 1842.

PEAR STREET, see CHESTNUT AVENUE

PENNINGTON AVENUE
This thoroughfare, which bears the name of the town to which it leads, is mentioned in an early record as the “Penny-town or Hopewell Road.” Part of this highway was also known as “ye Middle or Rodgers Road.” In much later years it became a turnpike. A toll gate, a short distance from the Five Points, tended by a Mr. Howell, is still fresh in the memories of members of the older generation. When the city line was extended the gate was removed to a point near Prospect Street.

PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE, see OHIO AVENUE

PERDICARIS PLACE
PerdicarisPlace is named for Gregory A. Perdicaris, a wealthy manufacturer and land owner. In 1865, when State Street was extended eastward from Clinton Avenue, it was cut clear through the premises of Mr. Pericardis, who owned southward nearly if not quite to the Assunpink where the present Pennsylvania Railroad station now stands. Years ago Harry A. Finch, an architect, recalled that he was commissioned to supervise the tearing down of the Perdicaris mansion, a modified Gothic structure which stood directly in the line of the extension.

PERRINE AVENUE
Perrine Avenue, in East Trenton, is named for the famous Perrine family. The late General Perrine owned a considerable farm beyond the Hargous Tract and in the ’60’s he sold it to John Taylor and D. P. Forst. Hence the city has Perrine Avenue, which marks nearly the south line of the old Perrine farm.

PERRY STREET
In the early days of Trenton there was no Perry Street. The thoroughfare that now bears that title was opened for public travel in September, 1813, a few weeks after Commodore Perry won the Battle of Lake Erie, thereby startling the British as well as the rest of the world with the prowess and bravery of the American sailors. Today Perry Street is an important artery in the traffic system of Trenton and forms a much-traveled route to the centre of the city.

PINE STREET, see CHESTNUT AVENUE

PLUM STREET, see CHESTNUT AVENUE

PRINCETON AVENUE
This thoroughfare, named for the town to which it leads, runs approximately on a line with Beakes Lane, which in Colonial days ran from the site of the Battle Monument to the Beakes plantation, about a quarter of a mile north. Princeton Road was incorporated as a turnpike in 1807 as a direct route to Princeton. Over it passed several lines of stage coaches. Toll gates were located at Buckman’s Corner, now Harney’s Corner, and at The Princessville Tavern. The name was changed from that of Princeton Turnpike to Princeton Avenue by city ordinance December 3, 1867.

PROSPECT STREET
Prospect Street, probably the outgrowth of a pretty ramble or lane over the rise of ground known as Prospect Hill, was once a part of the Rutherford estate, formerly Belville estate. When the section was open country the hill afforded a fine prospect of the Delaware. Belville mansion, once the home of several distinguished families, stood along West State Street, near the head of what is now Prospect Street. The original tract included the ownership and rights to a ferry.

QUARRY STREET
This street was named for the quarries that once existed in the locality. A portion of what is now West Hanover Street once was called Quarry Street. The name was changed to West Hanover by [END OF TEXT]

QUINTIN PLACE
Quintin Place, which runs from the intersection of Mercer and Livingston Streets along the southern bank of the Assunpink Creek, evidently bears the name of Andrew Quintin, founder of the old-time recreation garden, known as Washington Retreat, which embraced the land in this locality. Andrew Quintin was a brother of David S. Quintin, who conducted the race course and training stables in the Villa Park section of the city.

RANDALL AVENUE, see LALOR STREET

RESERVOIR STREET
Reservoir Street was named for the old city reservoir which occupied the tract now known as the Stadium. In 1857 it was proposed to name this thoroughfare Brearley Street in honor of Chief Justice Brearley, who lived nearby.

ROOSEVELT STREET, see MONROE STREET

ROSE STREET
The origin of the name of this thoroughfare is obscure. One contention is to the effect that it bears the name of the flower. This seems to be supported in part by a younger street, named Violet Street, one block distant. On the other hand there is a reason to believe that the street was named for Ebenezer P. Rose, a prominent resident of the town, or members of his family. The original stretch of Rose Street, the portion running to the junction of the Delaware & Raritan Canal with the Canal-Feeder, is known as Old RoseMiddle Rose and New Rose are extensions of Old Rose Street.

ROSSELL STREET
Rossell Street, once a part the old Beakes plantation, was named for General Zachariah Rossell who married Lydia, daughter of Nathan Beakes, and a great-granddaughter of Colonel William Trent. It was accepted by ordinance passed June 2, 1855. General Rossell served in the War of 1812. He died at Trenton, July 21, 1842.

RUSLING STREET
Rusling Street bears the name of one of the early families of Chambersburg. Gershom Rusling settled in the section about 1845. His sons, General James F. and William H. Rusling, were the promoters of the Linden Park Land Association, which embraced a part of Rusling Street, also a part of the development, is said to have been named for William H. Rusling.

RUTHERFORD AVENUE
This thoroughfare bears the name of the Rutherford family. John Rutherford for a number of years owned the Belleville estate in the western section of the city. Rutherford Avenue was accepted by ordinance passed September 1, 1885. It was extended by ordinance passed February 10, 1899.

SANFORD STREET
Sanford Street bears the name of the Sanford family. This thoroughfare, which runs from Brunswick to Princeton Avenue, was once the northern boundary of the Chambers tract. It is said that the late John Story Chambers suggested its name. It was near the northwest corner of the Chambers estate, now the corner of Sanford Street and Princeton Avenue, that General Washington and his field staff viewed the Battle of Trenton.

SANHICAN DRIVE
Sanhican Drive perpetuates the name of Sanhican Indians, a branch of the Lenni Lenapes who lived along the Delaware where Trenton now stands. Their settlement was also known as Sanhican. Sanhican Creek, formerly the water Power, was also named after the red men who lived at the Falls of the Delaware. The Sanhicans were skilled in the making of bead work, feather mantles and pottery. Products of their labor have been unearthed from time to time in the meadow lands in Broad Street Park.

SHERMAN AVENUE, see TYRELL AVENUE

SMITH AVENUE, see LALOR STREET

SOUTHARD STREET
This street was named in honor of Samuel L. Southard, who served as Law Reporter, Prosecutor of the Pleas, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, United States Senator, Secretary of the Navy and Attorney-General of New Jersey. He claimed Trenton as his residence from 1816 To 1838. The original stretch of Southard Street, from Ewing to Perry, was deeded to the city in May, 1850 by James M. Redmond and wife and William P. Sherman and wife. It was plotted in 1849.

SPRING STREET
How Spring Street got its name is a matter that can be explained in two ways. It may have obtained the appellation from the season of the year or, again, it may have received it from the springy ground of the vicinity. There are, by the way, streets for all the seasons – Spring, Summer, Fall and Winter. Winter, strangely enough, runs from Spring to Summer. Summer is a small street between Fowler and Calhoun Streets, while Fall Street extends from Union to the Delaware River.

SPRUCE STREET, see CHESTNUT AVENUE

STANTON STREET
This thoroughfare was named for Edwin McMasters Stanton, Secretary of War under President Lincoln.

STATE STREET
State Street was not the original name of that historic thoroughfare. It was on August 2, 1847, that an ordinance changed it from Second Street, its original title. The reason dates back to January 1792, when Joseph Brittain, a local shoemaker and a man of property, conveyed about three and one-half acres of land to the State of New Jersey as the site of the Capitol. Two and three-quarters acres were practically donated, the purchase price being only five shillings. For the rest of the plot, 67 pounds and 10 shillings were paid. Soon after William Reeder conveyed to the State one-quarter acre and George Ely a half acre, the former getting 62 pounds 10 shillings and the latter 120 pounds.

STEAMBOAT STREET
Steamboat Street was probably named for the steamboats on the Delaware. In 1857 it was proposed to change the name to Frelinghuysen Street.

STOCKTON STREET
Stockton Street commemorates the name of the Stockton family and especially Richard Stockton, signer of the Declaration of Independence. The name of Stockton has long been distinguished in the annals of the country in peace and war, and the naming of the street serves as a lasting memorial to that noted family.

STUYVESANT AVENUE
This thoroughfare, probably named for Peter Stuyvesant, the last and most worthy of the Dutch directors of the colony of New Amsterdam, now New York, was dedicated and accepted by the city by ordinance passed September 1, 1885. The street was extended by ordinance passed February 10, 1889.

SULLIVAN WAY
Sullivan Way perpetuates the name of General John Sullivan, who commanded one of the two divisions at the Battle of Trenton.

SUMMER STREET, see SPRING STREET

SWEETS AVENUE
This thoroughfare was named for the Sweet family. Originally the street extended but a short distance west from Princeton Avenue. It was accepted by ordinance passed September 2, 1873. By ordinance passed July 20, 1886, it was extended to Reservoir Street.

SYLVESTER AVENUE
Sylvester Avenue bears the given name of Sylvester Wilson, who lived and owned land in the locality.

TAYLOR STREET, see TYRELL AVENUE

TRENT STREET
Trent Street, once a part of the old Beakes plantation, bears the name of the Trent family. Mary Trent, daughter of William Trent, and granddaughter of Chief Justice William Trent, for whom Trenton is named married Nathan Beakes.

TUCKER STREET
Tucker Street, according to the diary of the late John Napton, was named for John R. Tucker, who served two terms as Mayor of Trenton. Preparations were made to open this thoroughfare from the Warren Street end in the Spring of 1847. Tucker Street runs through lands deeded to the city July 29, 1850, by John Bellerjeau and wife, Daniel Bellerjeau and wife, John Brearley, Eliza Brearley, A. Brearley, Jane Brearley, William B. Paul and wife, James K. Bellerjeau, Samuel O. Bellerjeau and George P. Sherman and wife. The street was accepted by Common Council March 12, 1851. The Bellerjeau family and the Tucker family were connected by marriage.

TYRELL AVENUE
Family names played an important part in the naming of city streets. Tyrell Avenue was named for Dr. John Tyrell, an old resident. Napton Street, in the same neighborhood, was named for a former mayor of Trenton. Ott Street preserves the name of a manufacturing potter. Taylor Street is for John Taylor, whose name was also made memorable with the Taylor Opera House. Hurley Street stands for the late Major Hurley, and Hart Avenuerecalls Dr. John S. Hart, former professor at the State schools and educator of national reputation. Dickinson Street is for the well-known family of that name. Sherman Avenue is for William P. Sherman, once mayor of Trenton and prominent in public affairs in the ’50’s.

VIRGINIA AVENUE, see LALOR STREET

VROOM STREET
This street perpetuates the name of Governor Peter Dumont Vroom. As Congressman-elect from New Jersey, he took an active part in the “Broad Seal War.” From 1853 to 1857 he was United States Minister to the Court of Berlin. He died at his home in Trenton in 1874.

WAINWRIGHT AVENUE
This street was named for George Wainwright, who for many years conducted a nursery on the tract which the street now divides. Mr. Wainwright was a native of England. The old homestead still stands at the corner of Wayne and Princeton Avenues.

WALL STREET
This street probably bears the name of Garret D. Wall, United States Senator from New Jersey, 1835-41. It is said that it was originally opened by William White about 1856. It was accepted by the city in 1868.

WALNUT AVENUE, see CHESTNUT AVENUE

WASHINGTON STREET, see MONROE STREET

WARREN STREET
Warren Street, originally known as King Street, perpetuates the name of General Joseph Warren of Revolutionary fame. It did not take this name at once following the close of the war as we are generally led to believe. Even as late as 1794, 11 years after the signing of the Treaty of Peace with Great Britain, this thoroughfare was designated in some newspaper advertisements as King Street. The name “King,” however, was not altogether popular for there seems to have been a movement about the middle of the 1780’s when it was referred to as “the front street” and “the main street.” The name, “Warren” probably did not come into general use until 1799-1800.

WILLOW STREET
Willow Street probably got its name from the possibility of willow trees in the vicinity of Petty’s Run which is in the neighborhood. The connection, of course, has long since disappeared and the street is a busy thoroughfare cutting across State Street and providing a route much used by autoists in order to avoid the centre-city traffic.

WINTER STREET, see SPRING STREET